A-OR-IST NO.1 by Various Artists

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A-OR-IST NO.1 by Various Artists

7.00

Published by A-or-ist

17cm x 24cm, 56 pages, black and white offset printing onto gloss stock throughout, two colour cardstock cover, saddle stitched, comes with A3 poster edition, 2015

A brand new collective publication from the editorial board of Amy Budd, Hannah Gregory, Alice Hattrick, Lizzie Homersham , Shama Khanna, Naomi Pearce, Jamie Sutcliffe and Jonathan P Watts - strength in numbers!

This first issue collects written contributions from an impressive roster and lays down promise for issue two. Here are a couple of excerpts to tempt you in...

Hannah Gregory
Review in Retrospect – Art & Language’s ‘The Air-Conditioning Show’ (1967–1972) 

The machines that rippled the intangible entity through the gallery served as an infrastructural unveiling – but it was not that the group wanted to draw attention to their appearance (though according to Baldwin the units did have ‘a gleam of technological modernity’ to them). Nor was this about imbuing the space with a heightened, spiritual quality, as per Yves Klein’s earlier immaterial gesture Le Vide (‘The Void’, 1957), which cleared out the gallery’s interior behind an azure façade. The installation’s normality was anti-mystique: the idea for what posed as an ephemeral or emperor’s-new-clothes-like installation was to critique the neutrality of nothing, and instead raise the stakes of what it means to exhibit something. What would happen to the experience of art if the expectation of an encounter were replaced with a barely perceptible, almost phenomenological, status quo?

Jamie Sutcliffe
Broken Tombs, Leaning Brooms, Severed Hands, Enchanted Lands
A Studio Visit with Kitty Clark

Kitty tells me about an important Youtube video. It’s a funny one. She found it while researching audio-animatronic developments at Disney World. In the short clip, originally captured on VHS, 18 April 1992, a robotic Abraham Lincoln recites a medley of speeches as part of Disney’s Hall of Presidents attraction in California. Mid-sentence, Lincoln’s body arches back in a yogic contortion before settling in a funereal repose, the lights dimming respectfully as Abe bows out of his ‘eternal scenario’ (Eco). I don’t notice until Kitty points it out, but the whole thing is scored by an aggressive canned laughter, which, when twinned with the physical distress of the mechanical torso, creates a disquieting scene. Clark’s particular interest in this footage seemed to arise at a moment when, despite the best intentions of the park’s technicians, the ‘magic was killed’.

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